Biden BLM nominee called to 'wage war on overpopulation'

Biden BLM nominee called to 'wage war on overpopulation'

President Biden’s nominee to lead the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) called to “wage war on overpopulation” in order to protect grizzly bears.

Tracy Stone-Manning, the president’s nominee for BLM director, wrote an essay published by the High Country News in February 1991 after she got married on how to preserve the grizzly bear population in the U.S.

Stone-Manning’s idea to help the endangered bear repopulate was to set aside land for them after our “Pyrrhic” victory of “conquering” the West, saying humans “have annexed too much space” and that humanity’s “greatest weapon in this battle has been our numbers.”

BIDEN NOMINEE CALLED FOR POPULATION CONTROL TO PROTECT ENVIRONMENT: ‘WE MUST BREED FEWER CONSUMING HUMANS’

“In fact, we keep marching on,” Stone-Manning wrote. “Now we are turning the weapon of overpopulation onto ourselves.”

“What would the demise of the grizzlies predict about our lives?” she continued.

Stone-Manning wrote that the population of the U.S. has “doubled” between 1940 and 1991, adding that the people she knew in Montana knew a different state in 1940.

“The local hillsides look like warzones now,” Stone-Manning claimed. “The damage is evident and the demise of the griz imminent, yet we continue our war cries while breeding our weapons.”

“We can bicker and moan at each other in our battle about what is going to help the bear now, but ultimately we need to look at maps less, crunch numbers less, and begin to wage war on overpopulation,” Stone-Manning concluded.

This is not the first time Biden’s nominee to lead the federal agency overseeing millions of acres of federal forests has supported population control.

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In sample advertisements she made for her graduate thesis, she referred to a human child as an “environmental hazard” and called for Americans to have no more than two children.

Stone-Manning has also come under fire throughout her nomination process for her ties to a 1989 tree-spiking plot in an Idaho forest. Tree-spiking is a form of ecoterrorism that can seriously injure or kill loggers. 

Stone-Manning’s nomination was discharged from committee earlier this week and she could have a full Senate vote on her nomination as early as Monday.